DKP News

Paula Johnson Joins A Critical Conversation on Criminal Justice Reform

Three adults sitting as panelists on stage

Kevin Richardson spent more than five years in a juvenile detention facility before he and the rest of the Central Park Five — Korey Wise, Antron McCray, Raymond Santana and Yusef Salaam — were exonerated in 2002 when the real perpetrator admitted to the crime. The Emmy-nominated Netflix miniseries “When They See Us” chronicles the boys’ journey in what Richardson said was an authentic depiction. He called Ava DuVernay “an angel sent from above” for her work as director.

Professor Paula Johnson, a member of the DK Collective, joined Kevin Richardson and Candice Carnage in a panel on justice.

Richardson told Oprah Winfrey in an interview released in June that he’d dreamed of playing the trumpet in SU’s marching band before he and four other boys were wrongfully convicted for the 1989 rape of a jogger in Central Park. At SU three decades later, he talked about his healing process and discussed justice in the United States. You can see a snipet of his dream being realized here

Read more on this panel and Richardson’s story in Daily Orange article here.

School of Education’s Haddix Wins AACTE Outstanding Book Award

Marcelle Haddix
Marcelle Haddix

The American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE) has announced Marcelle Haddix as the recipient of the 2018 AACTE Outstanding Book Award for her book “Cultivating Racial and Linguistic Diversity in Literacy Teacher Education: Teachers Like Me.” Haddix is Dean’s Associate Professor and chair of the Department of Reading and Language Arts in the School of Education. She will be recognized formally with the award at AACTE’s 70th Annual Meeting next month in Baltimore.  For more detail, please read the entire SU News article.

Hip-Hop Professor, Rapper A.D. Carson to Visit Syracuse Feb. 5 for Black History Month

Rapper A.D. Carson
Rapper A.D. Carson

The University observes Black History Month with a visit by A.D. Carson, a hip-hop scholar who created a popular rap album to defend his Ph.D. dissertation at Clemson University.

Carson, assistant professor of hip-hop and the global South at the University of Virginia (UVA), will discuss “Owning My Masters: The Rhetorics of Rhymes and Revolutions” on Monday, Feb. 5, at 5 p.m. in the Peter Graham Scholarly Commons (114 Bird Library). The event is free and open to the public.  Read the full article in SU News.

Maintaining the Audacity of Hope

The next week will be momentous for our country as we recognize a monumental public figure who challenged the U.S. government and society to create the more perfect union that the Constitution demands. On Monday, January 16, the nation remembered Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. on the official holiday that commemorates his legacy.  Notably, too, on Friday, January 20, we will mark the end the President Barack Obama’s two-terms as the first African American president, and begin the presidency of Donald Trump.  Read the full article in the Huffington Post.

Mellon-funded DK Summer Institute focuses on knowledge production to create more ‘just academy’

LeConté Dill’s grandparents were part of the Great Migration of African Americans from the rural South to the urban North and West, where, during the 1940s, they put down roots in South Los Angeles. Today, the once-vibrant neighborhood is plagued by gang violence, riots and poverty, causing many Black families, including hers, to pick up and leave.  Read the full article in AS News.

Feminist Scholar Awarded Guest Professorship in Germany

Chandra Talpade Mohanty served as Angela Davis Guest Professor at Goethe University

Chandra Talpade Mohanty—Distinguished Professor and chair of women’s & gender studies (WGS), as well as Dean’s Professor of the Humanities—spent part of December as the Angela Davis Guest Professor for International Gender and Diversity Studies at GU’s Cornelia Goethe Center. While there, she gave two public lectures and taught an intensive graduate-level workshop.  Read more the AS News article.

Democratizing Knowledge Collective Receives Mellon Grant

 “Just Academic Spaces” is the theme of a three-year, $500,000 project, organized and presented by the Democratizing Knowledge (DK) Collective in the College of Arts and Sciences and funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Co-directed by professors Linda Carty and Chandra Talpade Mohanty, the campus-wide project is designed to foster a model of exchange between community- and scholar-activists, in hopes of creating a more just academy.  Please read the SU News article for more details.